Podcast

Gamer Girl Porn & Sexy Streaming

Dass Frauen gerne zocken ist nichts Neues – dennoch wird die Gamerin auch heute noch mitunter als mythisches Wesen betrachtet und in Form des „Gamer Girls“ fetischisiert. Manche Frauen bedienen diesen Fetisch ganz gezielt durch pornografsiches Video- und Streaming-Material, andere haben einfach Spaß daran, ihre Körper selbstbewusst vor der Kamera zu präsentieren und dabei ihre Lieblingsspiele zu genießen. In der neuen Folge von „Random Encounters“ beleuchten Nina und Micha dieses komplexe Thema von allen Seiten und stellen zwei Streaming-Plattformen ausführlicher vor, die sich als erotische Alternative zu Twitch inszenieren: Nude Gamer und Plexstorm.

Hier geht’s zum Podcast: https://insertmoin.de/random-encounters-gamer-girl-porn-sexy-streaming

Und hier findet ihr weiterführende Informationen zum Thema, falls ihr euch intensiver einlesen wollt:

“‘Nude Gamer’ Is Twitch, But Horny on Purpose”: https://www.vice.com/amp/en_us/article/4agknm/nude-gamer-is-twitch-but-horny-on-purpose

“The Complicated Appeal of ‘Gamer Girl’ Porn”: https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/43835d/gamer-girl-porn-rule-34

Der Playboy hatte eine eigene Serie zum Thema mit dem Titel “Gamer Next Door”: http://www.playmates.com/franchise/gamer-next-door  (die Videos sind leider nicht mehr verfügbar)

Diverse Artikel über Twitchs schwierigen Umgang mit knapper Kleidung bzw. dem menschlichen (weiblichen) Körper:

https://www.kotaku.com.au/2015/03/why-people-are-arguing-about-women-streamers-showing-skin/ (2015)

“However, some people still believe that some women streamers rely more on flashing flesh — for instance, by wearing tank tops or other cleavage-revealing articles of clothing — than competitive skill or critique or in-game gags or what have you. Over the past few days, that’s all come to a head.”

“In it, Williams argued that women who don’t cover up — who use Twitch overlays that focus more on their physical characteristics than games — are trading credibility for popularity, for easy hits from horny dudes. In doing so, he claimed, they aren’t just hurting themselves, but all women streamers.”

“Some people want woman streamers who show a little skin, just as some people want dude streamers who are pros, or who suck at games but tell jokes, or who yell a lot, or who have cool voices, or who play music, or who pretend to be drunk, or what have you. Streaming is rarely just about games. There’s almost always a hook.“

https://www.theverge.com/2017/11/16/16654800/twitch-gaming-trainwrecks-banned-female-streamers-rant-moderation (2017)

But women can be accused of “exploiting” their looks just by appearing in public. ‘I can’t wear on stream what I’d wear on a regular non-stream day, for fear of harassment/judgment,’ tweeted musician and streamer Resurrection Fern. ‘If all the titty streamers were gone tomorrow, does anyone really think shitty people would stop degrading and insulting women?’ asked streamer Renée Reynosa. “Truth is, they’d just find another hoop for us to jump through.’”

“He acknowledged to Kotaku that his words had been ‘disgusting,’ and praised ‘amazing female streamers that provide great content.’ But the basic anger at sexy streamers seems unchanged, and it’s the same reasoning that lets trolls harass almost any female streamer for ‘manipulating’ men.”

“Clearer, consistently enforced rules would make it more obvious what Twitch thinks belongs on Twitch, instead of leaving it up for debate among self-appointed gatekeepers.”

https://www.polygon.com/2017/11/13/16644260/twitch-suspension-ban-trainwrecks (2017)

“Polygon reached out to Twitch for further explanation on how suspension lengths are decided for streamers; a representative declined to comment.

The issue for the community comes down to transparency. Twitch doesn’t answer direct questions about terms of service violations, and the terms of service page doesn’t offer much more information, either.”

https://kotaku.com/self-appointed-anti-boob-police-are-trolling-twitch-str-1823776968 (2018)

“According to some Twitch streamers, vigilante viewers are making a sport of trolling through the streaming platform’s directory and searching for broadcasters violating Twitch’s terms of service.”

https://kotaku.com/twitch-streamer-says-she-was-banned-for-suggestive-atti-1839040894 (2019)

“A few days later, she woke up to an email from Twitch saying that her channel was banned indefinitely because it contained “sexually suggestive content”. She believes her small channel only got banned because she was brigaded by people who then mass-reported her.

“ExoHydraX is a curvy woman, and is therefore subject to unfair standards and stereotypes. Clothing that might read as non-sexual on a woman who is less curvy is perceived differently when it’s on her.

According to her, Twitch is where the action is, and without having access to the platform, her streaming career is dead in the water.

https://kotaku.com/twitchs-latest-crackdowns-on-sexual-content-are-leaving-1838191470 (2019)

‘Mass reports seem automatically actioned sometimes, and it really offers the streamer no protection when real people aren’t the ones processing reports from potential trolls,’ she said. ‘That being said, if my case was looked at by an actual person, there’s definitely something more to it. Whether it’s personal bias, some kind of sexism or whatever other ‘ism’ it could be, it’s clear that Twitch has let the [terms of service]-breaking actions of many others slide, while I get penalized for wearing long shorts and a sports bra so big it’s practically a crop top.’”

“‘I think what makes these bans difficult to define is Twitch caring about context more than anything,’ Devoue said. ‘For example, you can stream in a bikini, but only if it’s for use by a pool, not just sitting in your apartment. Nudity in a video game is allowed, to an extent, but nudity elsewhere is not.’“

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/z3b9je/twitch-clarifies-nudity-and-attire-policy-to-say-how-much-boob-you-can-show (2020)

“Previously, Twitch stipulated that streamers should dress to feel comfortable in a public place, like a mall. This didn’t help users who sought clarity on what they could and could not wear; different people feel comfortable in different kinds of outfits, and a pair of leggings and a sports bra can come across as functional, sexy, or both depending on circumstances and perspective.

Now the guidelines are very specific: streamers who identify as women can’t show their nipples or their underbust, and all streamers must cover their genital area, “extending from your waist to the bottom of your pelvis and buttocks.” All garments must be opaque—sheer clothing is not an acceptable covering.”

While these new rules add helpful clarity for streamers, and can be looked at when some knucklehead tries to mass report a streamer for daring to wear a v-neck T-shirt, dictating the amount of skin a person can show is just a weird way to think about a human body. Women are already under a huge amount of scrutiny from people who want to police what they wear and how they exist in a space. Creating very specific guidelines like this could turn out to be the equivalent of giving those people radar guns and ticket books. While Twitch is updating their policies, maybe they could take a look at the guidelines on gender based harassment as well.”